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Author Topic: cheap ammo source  (Read 9650 times)
8thFA
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« on: December 28, 2015, 05:20:27 AM »

Hi All!

I bought a hand gun a few months ago and have been shooting it quite a bit.  As you all know, ammo isn't exactly cheap, but I'm thankful I went with a 9mm over a .40 which was my first choice.

Where do you guys go for cheap ammo?  Anyone go the online route?

I've found that wally world seems to be the cheapest but I'd still like to go cheaper.  Appreciate any comments you guys have.

BTW, was on my way to the range saturday morning and had run out of ammo so I stopped at Cabelas.  200 rounds of ammo cost twenty bucks more that wally world. 

Thanks
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Lumspond
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« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2015, 08:55:59 AM »

Welcome to the group!
I do order online, but you are paying a lot for shipping.
Here are a few sites to check out. With some of them, you can set a price and receive an alert.

http://www.luckygunner.com/bulk-ammo
http://ammoseek.com
http://www.gunbot.net/ammo/223-556/
http://www.ammospy.net/ammo/handgun
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New Castle County
RetCapt1994
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« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2015, 08:56:25 AM »

I have been using these sites for years and have had no problems with any of them.  www.ammoman.com -  www.sgammo.com -  www.ammunitionstore.com - www.wideners.com - www.ammunitiondepot.com, this is a good site for carry/defense ammo. They also have some good sales on bulk. Again I have never had a problem with any of these dealers. You just have to be a smart shopper. Good luck to you and stay safe.
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Glock Armorer - Tavor Level One Armorer
It is all about bullet placement                          Carry permits, de ccw,pa ccw and leosa/hr218  DELAWARE SUCKS--THE WORSE STATE
8thFA
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« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2015, 12:33:53 PM »

Cool, I'll check out these links, thanks!
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robberbaron
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« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2015, 02:57:25 PM »

The high cost is what got me to start re-loading about 2 years ago. Just a Lee Classic turret press (less than $200.00) and a tumbler ($35.00) and range brass (free). I buy the bullets from X-Treme and they have free shipping from time to time. I can re-load 9mm for about $5.00/box, .40 S&W for about $6.00/box and .45 ACP for about $7.50/box. It takes some time to get the hang of it, but that is about all I shoot now.
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Adrenolin
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« Reply #5 on: December 30, 2015, 03:52:00 AM »

Order a 1000 rounds or more when possible. My preferred range/bulk ammo is S&B 115gr but it's been hard to find lately in bulk. Expect to spend $209-240 per 1000 rounds in bulk online.

Also look for larger boxes of defensive rounds. I only use Speer Gold-Dot 9mm HP rounds in my 9mm handguns because it feeds 100% in them all. The boxes of 20 sell for $20-25 bucks however I order the LE 50 round boxes online for $31ish which is a huge savings.

Agree on the reloading option mentioned above. Save all your range brass and just dump it into a ziplock when shooting. The lee classic is cheap and reliable and 9mm is easy to reload. I bought a tumbler but hated it. Bought a double drum roller from Harbor Freight with SS pins off amazon and it's much better imo.
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seniorgeek
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« Reply #6 on: December 30, 2015, 06:03:34 AM »

 "I bought a tumbler but hated it. Bought a double drum roller from Harbor Freight with SS pins off amazon and it's much better imo."

Adrenolin is correct. I also have the double tumbler from Harbor Freight and it works well.
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Radnor
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« Reply #7 on: December 30, 2015, 10:31:23 AM »

Since reloading came up, will post a link to this thread.
See replies 2 & 10. (really read the whole thing)
http://deccw.com/index.php?topic=2026.0

As far as tumbler, I have a LARGE one from Lee (I think).
Crushed corn cob.  As far as polish, NuFinish car wax liquid.
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NRA Certified Instructor and Training Counselor, CRSO
Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, PPITH, Home Firearm Safety, and Reloading

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Cbmarine
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« Reply #8 on: December 30, 2015, 02:44:27 PM »

A few notes on the advantages of reloading:
- having supplies costs less to stockpile than finished ammo
- within limits, you can reallocate supplies, (consult your reloading manual) e.g.,
-- small pistol primers are good for 9mm, .40, and some .45
-- powders such as Power Pistol, HS-6, Accurate #7 are good for 9mm and .40
- you can tune your loads to your application
- you can buy in bulk: powder in 1, 4, and 8 pounds typically, bullets in 1000s and 6000s. Primers in 1K lots
- you can mimic your EDC loads within reason

Caution: handle primers carefully especially when decapping a fired case.  Somewhere in the DSPC newsletter archives is a case where a Reloader developed high blood lead levels (BLL), probably from the corn cobs in the tumbler. I put range brass in a plastic baggie, decap before sonic cleaning, and put spent primer in a baggie.  

Make a list of your supply needs and options. Pick up supplies when your inventory is low or supplies are limited. Better to have less than optimal supplies than none at all.  I have not seen Power Pistol or Alliant 2400 on the shelf in years.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2015, 12:44:37 PM by Cbmarine » Logged

"The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own… [W]hile [evil men] cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles." — Jeff Cooper, The Art of the Rifle
New Castle County
Adrenolin
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« Reply #9 on: December 31, 2015, 08:08:43 AM »

Reloading sounds like a lot of work and steps, and it is to be honest, however once you get things worked out it becomes much easier. I found used casing prep the thing that held me back mostly so I'd de-prime and clean my casings in batches ensuring that I always had prepped casings. At that point the reloading process is quiet simple.
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PPScarry
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« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2016, 01:49:46 PM »

You guys need to teach a class at Del Tech or something. Got one customer here. I think I need adult supervision for a few thousand rounds! I'd be willing to buy the necessary items and tools. Someday that may be all there is as far as prepping goes. Plus I like to shoot and would probably shoot more if I could bring down the cost. 22l isn't as fun, honestly.

Lead poisoning? Phfflt! How long does that take, I'm over half dead already. (just kidding I know it's serious)
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robberbaron
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« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2016, 04:26:54 PM »

I know it has become a cliche, but I have found YouTube to be an excellent source for info. I am a visual learner and have been able to find so many videos that are detail oriented for the particular press being used. I still have the Lee turret press, but recently upgraded to a Hornady Lock N' Load AP press. 1 round is made with each pull of the handle vs. 4 pulls with the Lee. I am still working on the fine tuning, but it is a huge upgrade in speed. Hornady has an entire series of videos available, as well as the after market posters. So far, only .45 ACP, but I will slowly move everything over. I will keep the turret press, as it is bullet proof and will be a great backup, in case something breaks on the Hornady.
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Tonym
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« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2016, 04:56:12 PM »

I learned everything i know about reloading on youtube and internet forums. It takes a lot of money up front but pretty much everything i load i can shoot for at most, half what it cost to buy new ammo at walmart. If youre a hands on type of person who can easily accomplish projects around the house or under the hood, reloading is easy. Its wayyyy easier if youre only doing straight wall pistol cases over bottle neck rifle rounds
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PPScarry
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« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2016, 05:51:01 PM »

Do you need a room to do it in. Wonder if the lead is a concern. I'm going to watch some youtube for sure. Cheaper 380, 9 & especially 45 would be great and worth the time to me.
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"There are men in all ages who mean to govern well, but they mean to govern. They promise to be good masters, but they mean to be masters. "
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 American Lexicographer
Cbmarine
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« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2016, 06:05:35 PM »

Do you need a room to do it in.
A 4' workbench with shelves above is adequate.

Wonder if the lead is a concern...
if you are casting your own bullets, yes.  Otherwise, no.

Along with youtube, the Hornady Reloading Manual has a wealth of info on reloading how-to and both internal and external ballistics, including the importance of case length and cartridge overall length (COL).
« Last Edit: February 15, 2016, 11:25:19 AM by Cbmarine » Logged

"The rifle itself has no moral stature, since it has no will of its own… [W]hile [evil men] cannot be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles." — Jeff Cooper, The Art of the Rifle
New Castle County
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