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Author Topic: reloading .45  (Read 2392 times)
Just Bill
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« on: October 18, 2017, 03:48:40 PM »

How many times can you reload .45 brass.  Low to mid end of power, not hot loads.  I have seen anywhere from 5 to almost unlimited.  I saw one guy that said he has been reloading the same brass since 1985.  They say .45 brass shrinks, unlike rifle brass.  Jamming the cartridge into the chamber, then slamming it onto the breech actually shrinks it.  There is a point at which it becomes not too good to reload, but I am not sure where that is.

Bill T
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Tonym
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« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2017, 02:20:38 PM »

I dont even count the number of reloads on my straight wall pistol brass. .45 asp is pretty low pressure so itll last you a while. Just pay attention to your primer pockets and watch for cracks.  Any shrinking that would happen loading into the chamber would be pretty insignificant compared to the expanding when its fired and then the shrinking again when you resize it.
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Just Bill
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« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2017, 03:56:24 PM »

I have searched the net and find everything from 10-12 to 'I have been loading the same brass since 1985'.  For target loads, I suspect the number is high.  For hotter loads, I would check the brass carefully.

BT
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Clarence
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« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2017, 03:18:33 AM »

For necked down rifle cases, annelling is commonly done.  Difficult for a short straight wall case as you need to keep the heat off of the primer end.  Does not seem worth the hassle for commonly available brass like .45 ACP
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ampb5rider
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« Reply #4 on: May 04, 2018, 11:02:40 AM »

When the case cracks, I've shot and reloaded countless times, I've even shot the crack case rounds. If I find one prior to loading I'll set aside as I wouldn't want a miss feed because the crack will allow the case to expand during it's travel up the feed ramp.
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greymas
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« Reply #5 on: May 06, 2018, 06:58:05 PM »

I end up losing them before they go bad.
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Radnor
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« Reply #6 on: May 07, 2018, 04:44:26 AM »

I end up losing them before they go bad.


What he said ^^^

PLUS, I load a FULL power load.  I personally do not want to go from a low to mid range load
and have to shoot carry ammo and have a pause because of the difference in how they shoot.
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